Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW

  • 5 replies
  • 238 views
*

darchildre

  • *
  • 1
  • heathen contemplative
    • they/them
Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW
« on: June 06, 2019, 02:41:29 PM »
Hi, I'm Ev.  I will be honest and admit that I don't quite remember how I got to this forum, but I believe it was through a link in a Facebook discussion group.  I've been a practicing heathen since about 2000 and an ADF druid since 2013 - currently working through the Dedicant Path.  I stumbled over the idea of polytheist monasticism a few years ago while looking for resources on pagan liturgy and felt an immediate tug towards it.  Since then, I've been slowly refining my personal practice in that direction.

My daily practice consists of four daily altar prayers, contemplative meditation, and prayer beads.  (Well, in an ideal world, at least.)  My major devotional relationships are with Nerthus, Frigga, and Loki.  I'm drawn to monastic practice both because I love the contemplative aspects and because, to be honest, I function best in structured environments with clear rules and plenty of repetition. 

In my non-religious life, I work in a small-town library, do a lot of yarn-crafts, and play a lot of D&D. 

*

Syren Nagakyrie

  • *
  • 25
    • she/her, they/them
    • Syren's Blog
Re: Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2019, 01:22:17 PM »
Welcome to the forum, Ev! I think there are many people here who may share your interests. I appreciate structure also, and that is one of the things that draws me to monasticism.

*

Danica Swanson

  • CEO (Creative Endarkenment Overseer) at Black Stone Abbey
  • *****
  • 115
  • Contemplative Norse polytheist
    • she/her
    • Black Stone Abbey
Re: Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 12:01:15 PM »
Greetings, Ev, and welcome to the forum.

I love seeing the phrase "heathen contemplative" used as a self-description! I've used that phrase occasionally to describe myself too. Heathenism needs a well-developed movement of contemplatives. We need more visible alternatives to the Viking brosatru stereotypes.

Thanks for joining us here!

*

barefootwisdom

  • *
  • 34
    • he/him
    • barefootwisdom
Re: Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2019, 09:23:24 AM »
Welcome, Ev!

Heathenism needs a well-developed movement of contemplatives. We need more visible alternatives to the Viking brosatru stereotypes.
Yes, please!  In my own life experience, I can say that whenever I've felt a pull (which I'm still trying to make sense of) toward some of the Powers of Yggdrasil, it's been immediately followed by intense confusion and perplexity, precisely because I don't fit those stereotypes at all.  It was the online example of folks like Danica, Sarenth, and a very few others who helped me to see that there is room for alternatives, and that I shouldn't dismiss this invitation out of hand.  That said, I'm still feeling more than a little perplexed and confused, but at least now it's in ways that I can work with!  ;)

Also, the phrase "Viking brosatru" is a keeper!  Thanks for this!  ;)

*

Danica Swanson

  • CEO (Creative Endarkenment Overseer) at Black Stone Abbey
  • *****
  • 115
  • Contemplative Norse polytheist
    • she/her
    • Black Stone Abbey
Re: Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2019, 01:05:56 PM »
I can say that whenever I've felt a pull (which I'm still trying to make sense of) toward some of the Powers of Yggdrasil, it's been immediately followed by intense confusion and perplexity, precisely because I don't fit those stereotypes at all.  It was the online example of folks like Danica, Sarenth, and a very few others who helped me to see that there is room for alternatives, and that I shouldn't dismiss this invitation out of hand.  That said, I'm still feeling more than a little perplexed and confused, but at least now it's in ways that I can work with!

I went through something similar when I first discovered Heathenism, so it makes me very happy to hear that my work contributed to your sense that there may be room for you to honor the Norse deities and spirits without having to join a Viking brosatru kindred or something.

There's also Heathen Women United, which is doing wonderful work to provide anti-racist, brosatru-free spaces.

And I agree about Sarenth - his blog is a great resource! As it happens, Sarenth was the very first person to visit the shrine room I built for Skaði at the first Many Gods West conference in 2015, and I can confirm that he's just as wonderful and kind-hearted in person as he is on his blog. I was so nervous when I opened the doors to that shrine room, as it was the first time I'd done devotional work like that in public - nerve-wracking for a long-time hermit and confirmed introvert who typically avoids conferences and large groups! But Sarenth started things off on the right note.

Also, the phrase "Viking brosatru" is a keeper!  Thanks for this!

I like it too, though I can't take credit for it. I don't know who originated it, but it's right on target. Heathenism is overrun with hyper-masculinized Viking imagery. I think "brosatru" started reaching a wider audience when the #havamalwitches movement of Heathen feminists began. That's when I first heard of it, at least.

There are lots of other "bro-" neologisms too, of course. A couple of years ago I learned (to my great amusement) that in drone music communities there are "brones," described as:

"...producers of beardgaze, the largely male chin stroking subset of drone that threatens the genre's potential from within (brones cannot gaze past their beards to their navels; even if brones don't have beards, they're stroking something)."

I cracked up when I heard the term "brones," though I certainly can't say I'm surprised that a term was coined to identify them. "Bros" are a very widespread problem.


*

silencem

  • *
  • 9
    • he/him
    • Walking the Heartroad
Re: Devotional heathen contemplative in the PNW
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2019, 12:21:45 PM »
Hello from another library employee and fiber arts fiend! I work in digital collections (medical library) and have knit for many years; these days I'm mostly sewing, though I try to make enough pairs of socks to satisfy family members at the holidays.